What Is A Home Visit?

As an organization we are completely focused on teaching your child how to eat.

Our Netcoaching, Eating Schools, and Learn To Eat programs have been designed specifically to address the needs that your child has and the issues they may face with learning to eat.

There are certain instances, though, where as a parent, you really want the physical presence of a member of our NoTube team to help your child learn to eat.

That’s where a home visit can work wonders.

Before the home visit, we help define specific, customized goals for your child. We do our utmost to significantly improve your child’s feeding and eating situation in the shortest possible time by highly specialized and repeated life-interventions throughout the day, sharing all mealtimes, opportunity for snacks as well as constantly interacting with your child.

We will also meet with all family members or professional teams (such as your doctors) that interact with your child on a regular basis. Throughout the entire home visit the NoTube specialist is able to contact the NoTube home team at all times to discuss and share any concerns involving medical or specific nutritional details.

Whereas normal practitioners will have you visit them for single sessions and only get a glimpse of your family’s situation, we prefer to stay for 1-5 days and spend all awake time during the days with you (8 AM – 10 PM). This way, we can drill down to the nitty-gritty details of common interactions between you and your child and help fix them right when they occur.

If you wish, in order to ensure fast adoption of our recommendations into new behavioral patterns our expert is also prepared to stay at your home overnight, providing 24-hour support. In our experience, we have been able to resolve almost any feeding related issues with this kind of well-timed ultra-intensive home therapy. However, we are also respectful to provide you with the much-needed privacy during such an intensive time.

Feeding Therapy Home Visits

Advantages Of A Home Visit

Advantage 1 - Home Visit
Your child can receive the intensive specialized care they deserve in your own home.

Advantage 2 - Home Visit
No risk of hospital-acquired infections.

Advantage 3 - Home Visit
Includes weekend visits to match your schedule.

Advantage 4 - Home Visit
No travel costs for your family, we come to you and travel expenses are kept to a minimum.

Advantage 5 - Home Visit
Medical assessment beforehand so there are no wasted fees.

Advantage 6 - Home Visit
Transparent pricing and no hidden fees.

How Does A Home Visit Work Best?

1

START WITH AN ASSESMENT

In order to make our visit meaningful and productive, every child has to undergo a thorough medical, nutritional and developmental assessment by the NoTube team prior to the home visit.
This ensures that we can be sure to be able to really help you and your child. It also protects you from spending the funds for the home visit unnecessarily only to later discover that we actually cannot help you because your child might suffer from a different problem as we address.

 

2

PREPARE FOR HOME VISIT

After your child has passed the primary online assessment we will get in touch with you over our patented secure online platform and let you know if any preparations might be needed to be performed prior to the visit. This step will likely involve you submitting feeding protocols of your child’s food intake as well as videos showing your child’s current interaction with food. Based on this information we will make suggestions how to best time and adjust the current situation to prepare you and your child for the home visit.

 

3

SCHEDULE THE RIGHT TIME

When we feel that the appropriate time has come (i.e. all the preparations have been completed successfully), we will arrange a home visit that fits your schedule. Since our team is on call 365 days per year, many home visits take place during the weekend and include holiday times to ideally match your needs. Another welcome benefit of a home visit is to assist in unexpected situations of crisis when the stress of tube dependence or of any other early feeding disorder has become so intensive that oral aversion has increased to an unbearable point, all food is refused and normal family life has become impossible.

Home Visit Costs

ASSESSMENT

EUR120

USD 145

A medical assessment must be conducted before any home visit with a one time cost of EUR 120.- If the patient is already engaged in one of our other programs or has in the last 6 months prior to the home visit completed a program, the assessment fee will be waived.

HOME VISIT DAILY COST

EUR1,500

USD 1,780

The cost for a home visit is EUR 1’500,- per day excluding expenses (travel and accommodation expenses if our expert does not stay with your family). From the third day onwards the cost is EUR 1’000,- per day (with the first two being charged at EUR 1’500,- per day). We do not charge extra for the nights that we spend with you even if there should be a need for us to help at night. You will also never encounter any additional fees that were not previously mutually agreed on.

Wonder if a Home Visit might be the solution for your child?

GET A FREE EVALUATION

Where Do We Travel?

To date, we have completed home visits in most European countries (France, Germany, the Netherlands, UK etc.) as well as occasional home visits to Canada, the US, Israel and Australia. With intercontinental destinations (we are based in Europe), we suggest a minimum stay of at least two days long at your home to capitalize on the presence of our expert. Many of these parents have told us that the home visit was the crucial missing piece to their child’s feeding puzzle!

Download Ebook: 7 critical concerns when considering tube weaning

Transitioning from tube to oral feeding is an immense challenge for both parents and their child.

This free guide helps clarify the main concerns that parents may face during the transition:

  • What if my child can’t swallow liquid?
  • What if my child vomits?
  • What if my child loses weight?
  • Will my child need enteral support after the transition?





critical concerns on tube weaning